News

10 January 2019

It’s not just the purchase price – costs to consider when buying a house

One of the most important questions for buyers to ask when considering purchasing a house is – can I afford it?

When purchasing a property and planning your budget, it is more than just the purchase price that you should anticipate.

You should keep in mind the following costs:

  1. Transfer duty (stamp duty)

If you are buying a property for the first time, or buying a property to live in, there are concessions available for transfer duty.  However, in many instances duty will be payable on the transaction and it is not cheap!

You can calculate a cost estimate of how much duty you will need to pay using the online calculator from the Office of State Revenue.  This will tell you how much you should be setting aside.

The calculator can be accessed here.

  1. Bank fees and charges

It is common for banks to approve a loan and then take their fees from the amount of the loan.  This means the amount they will actually provide for you to purchase the property, may be less than the amount you have been approved for.

Loan fees vary from bank to bank and can depend a lot on what type of loan you are taking out.  You should ask up front for an estimate of the bank fees associated with the loan to make sure you have enough to cover all the costs at settlement.

You may also be required to pay for a valuation for the property.  In some instances your bank may require a valuation to decide whether they will lend you money for the purchase and how much they are willing to provide.

  1. Land registry fees

The Queensland Government charges a fee (which changes based on purchase price) to register the change of ownership of a property and to register a mortgage.  This fee is paid by the buyer so don’t forget to factor this in to your budget as well.

You can calculate the lodgement fees here.

  1. Adjustments

Usually in a conveyancing matter, the outgoings for the property, such as council rates, body corporate levies, rent and water usage, are apportioned at settlement.  For outgoings already paid, this means the buyer makes a further payment to the seller (by way of an adjustment at settlement) to cover their share of costs.

Depending on the time of year you are purchasing and the particular outgoings, this could add a few hundred dollars to the overall amount required for settlement.

  1. Insurance

Under most contracts, the risk in the property passes to the buyer from the day after the contract is entered into, not when settlement actually happens.  This means that buyers need to take out insurance as soon as the contract is signed, not when it’s time to move in.

This is another upfront cost that is important to remember.

  1. Legal fees

We always recommend that you engage a lawyer to assist you with the conveyancing process.  While this is an additional cost, buying a house is often the biggest financial investment you will make in your life, so it pays to engage a professional to assist you through the process, so it is done right.

At Miller Harris Lawyers we have an experienced property law team that can assist you with the conveyancing process.  Please feel free to contact us for further information.

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