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Changing your child’s name after separation

April 30th, 2019

After separation, it is not uncommon for one spouse to change their name back to their maiden name as opposed to keeping their married name.  But what about changing a child’s name?

As family lawyers we are often asked about the process for legally applying to register a change of a child’s name.

Section 17 of the Births, Deaths and Marriages Registration Act 2003, provides that:

  1. the parents of a child may apply to the Registrar for registration of a change of the child’s name; and
  2. an application for registration of a change of a child’s name may be made by one parent if the applying parent is the only parent named in the registration of the child’s birth (on their birth certificate), or there is no other surviving parent, or a Magistrate approved the proposed change of name.

This essentially means that if both parents are registered on the child’s birth certificate they must agree to the name change.  If both parents do not agree, then the only way to register a name change is if an application is made to the court and the court makes an order for the name to be changed.

When considering whether or not a name change is in the child’s best interests, the court will have regard to, among other factors and the particular circumstances of the matter:[1]

  1. any embarrassment likely to be experienced if his or her name is different from the parent with residence or care and control;
  2. any confusion of identity which may arise if his or her name is changed or is not changed;
  3. the effect any change in surname may have on the relationship between the child and the parent whose name the child bore during the relationship;
  4. the effect of frequent or random changes of name;
  5. the contact that the non-custodial parent has had and is likely to have in the future with the child;
  6. the degree of identification which the child or children have with their non-custodial parent; and
  7. the degree of identification which the child or children have with the parent with whom they live.

This article focuses on the legal process to register a change in name.  A child’s name can be informally changed through use of a different name.  You should seek legal advice before informally changing your child’s name, especially if there are court orders already in place.

If an informal name change is made through use, the other parent can make an application to the court for the child to only be known by their legal name.

If you are wanting to change your child’s name we recommend that you first obtain legal advice.  Please do not hesitate to contact one of our experienced Cairns family lawyers today to discuss your matter.

[1] Reagan & Orton [2016] FamCA 330.

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What happens when separated parents cannot agree upon which school their child will attend?

February 5th, 2019

After parents have separated, it is not uncommon for many issues in relation to their children to come into dispute.  These issues may have previously been agreed upon prior to separation.  One issue that we see often in family law is the choice of school which your child will attend.  When this issue comes into dispute it can cause a significant deterioration in the relationship between the parents, as well as anxiety and stress for both the parents and child.

Which school a child will attend is a decision that both parents need to make jointly, unless one parent has sole parental responsibility for the child.

With the new year fast approaching, here are some tips on steps to take to resolve your dispute about schooling prior to the commencement of the first term:

  1. Raise the issue of schooling early and well before the commencement of the school term. Communicate with the other parent about which school you would like your child to attend and the reasons why.
  2. If the other parent does not agree with the school you have proposed and they propose an alternative school, consider whether or not that school would be in the best interests of your child. At the very least you should make your own enquiries and research about the school before coming to any conclusion.
  3. If you still have not reached an agreement invite the other parent to attend family dispute resolution, also known as mediation, to further discuss the issue of schooling. You should prepare for the mediation by researching all schools that have been suggested or which your child could potentially attend and the reasons why you propose your child attends or does not attend those schools

If an agreement can’t be reached at mediation, you will be issued with what is known as a section 60I certificate which will enable you to commence court proceedings to have a court decide which school your child will attend.  This should be a last resort.  Prior to commencing proceedings, you should obtain expert legal advice from an experienced family lawyer about what considerations the court will take into account.  This may also assist you in your negotiations.

If you require assistance with your family law parenting matter, contact our team of expert Cairns family lawyers today on (07) 4036 9700 or enquiries@millerharris.com.au.

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