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How will a family lawyer help me?

June 1st, 2021

Family lawyers assist people considering or experiencing separation in more ways than you might think.

We will advise you on the law as it applies to you; that part is fairly obvious.  But what isn’t is just how many legal issues family lawyers have to consider.  They include:

  • separation and divorce;
  • de facto and matrimonial property settlements;
  • spousal maintenance applications;
  • parenting issues;
  • applications by grandparents and other significant people in children’s lives;
  • child support;
  • child protection;
  • domestic violence,

and the list goes on.

Family lawyers in and out of court

Family lawyers assist separated people both within and outside of the Family Law Court system.  The majority of matters can be resolved by consent without the need to apply to court for orders.  This saves the parties the stress, costs and emotional toll of being involved in court proceedings.

A settlement outside of court is most commonly achieved through lawyers conducting negotiations on your behalf, or if necessary, via mediation or settlement meetings.  Your family lawyer can then take the necessary steps to make the settlement legally binding.

If your matter can’t be settled outside of court, or is urgent, your family lawyer can prepare the court material to commence the court application.  Your lawyer will advise you every step of the way, represent you in dealings with the other party and their lawyer, the Judge and relevant court experts.  Your lawyer will appear for you at court events including court mentions and hearings and court-ordered mediations.

Going to court

There is still a very high chance that even if your matter proceeds to the courts, it will settle along the way.  Only about 5% of matters actually proceed to a trial at which a Judge makes the decision.  This is good news.  Even if you require the court to assist you to resolve your matter, statistics tell us that there is still a very good chance that you and your former partner will, in the end, be able to reach agreement on settlement.

Initially however, the real value in consulting an experienced family lawyer comes from their ability to analyse your particular situation and the applicable law and create a separation plan with you.  For example, if you have children, property investments, insufficient income to support yourself and are in the process of separating, the laws relating to divorce, matrimonial property settlement, spousal maintenance, children’s matters and child support are all relevant to your situation.

Feeling overwhelmed?  You needn’t.  An experienced family lawyer who specialises in the practise of family law can advise you and map out the way forward.  This can usually be achieved during a 1 hour initial consultation.

Our job is to take a complicated situation and make it as SIMPLE as possible.

If you are separating or divorcing or considering it, feel rest assured we are here to help.   Contact me or one of our experienced family lawyers today on 07 4036 9700 to book your no-obligation consultation.

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Am I in a de facto relationship?

March 17th, 2020

As a family lawyer, I am regularly asked the question – am I in a de facto relationship?

The answer to this question is not as simple as you might expect.  A person will be considered to be in a de facto relationship if, having regard to all of the circumstances of the relationship, they have a relationship as a couple and are living together on a genuine domestic basis.

The most well-known test for determining whether two people are in a de facto relationship, is whether they have been living together as a couple for more than two years.  However, a couple can be living together for less than two years and still be considered to be in a de facto relationship.  Other factors that need to be considered include:

  1. the duration or length of the relationship;
  2. the nature and extent of their common residence;
  3. whether a sexual relationship exists;
  4. the degree of financial dependence, interdependence or financial support between them;
  5. ownership, use and acquisition of property;
  6. the degree of mutual commitment to a shared life;
  7. whether the relationship was registered;
  8. the care and support of children; and
  9. the reputation and public aspects of the relationship.

The most common situations in which people may be found to be in a de facto relationship, despite not living together as a couple for more than two years are where:

  1. the couple have a child together; or
  2. the couple have intermingled their finances, such as by purchasing a property together.

A lot of people want to avoid being in a de facto relationship because they believe that this will automatically entitle their partner to a share of their assets.  It is important to note that even if you are considered to be in a de facto relationship, this does not necessarily mean that your partner is entitled to a share in your property or assets.  The court must first determine whether or not an adjustment of property between the spouses is necessary to do justice between them, based on their respective contributions to the relationship and their future needs.  In some circumstances the court will not intervene if the property interests as they stand are just and equitable.

If you would like to discuss your relationship, property settlement or obtain advice on your family law matter, contact one of our Cairns and Mareeba family lawyers today.

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