News

28 April 2020

COVID-19: The impacts of Coronavirus on family law and parenting

Co-parenting can be difficult at the best of times.  The additional uncertainty and significant changes in response to the global pandemic will see parents face new challenges.

The message from the courts is that where possible parents should continue to comply with existing court orders.  It is not clear at this stage, what the courts will consider a reasonable excuse for not complying with a parenting order in the context of the pandemic.  Parents are being encouraged by the courts to use their common sense and to act reasonably as new challenges present as a result of the pandemic.  Communication will be crucial as parents navigate through the temporary restrictions in place, particularly in relation to travel and quarantine.

If orders cannot be complied with, or parents seek to change arrangements during the pandemic, parents should, in the first instance, try to reach an agreement in writing with the other parent about what is to occur, including consideration of makeup time if time is not proceeding in accordance with orders.  Parents are being reminded by the courts that they should always prioritise the best interests of the children, their health, safety and wellbeing.

If you are in a situation where you believe that you are unable to comply with court orders and the other parent does not agree, and the issue cannot be resolved between you, you should seek legal advice.

Parents should attempt to work through issues reasonably and sensibly to prevent any more distress during this time.  They should keep each other informed about any health issues or concerns as they arise.  If issues arise that cannot be resolved, they may be able to be negotiated through lawyers or through alternative dispute resolution services, such as mediation which continue to be offered remotely.

Travel restrictions

The latest direction from the Queensland Chief Health Officer permits persons to cross the border for the following purposes:

  • to continue existing arrangements (such as parenting plan arrangements) for children under 18 years to have contract with their parents and siblings who they do not live in the same household with (but contact with vulnerable groups, such as persons over 70 years, is not permitted);
  • to provide care or support to an immediate family member; and
  • to attend any court of Australia or to comply with court orders (including parenting orders).

The courts and the government are continually reviewing and updating travel restrictions, so it is always best to obtain advice on the current arrangements that apply to your situation.

Our lawyers are continuing to advise clients on all family law matters.  Please do not hesitate to contact us on 07 4036 9700 if you have any questions or concerns regarding your family law matter during this difficult time.

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